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Supplementation of methionine and lysine in locally available feed ingredients based diet on the performance of broiler chicken and quail.

Two experiments on broiler chicken were conducted at Animal Nutrition Division (NARC) Khumaltar and one at Regional Agricultural Research Station, Parwanipur, during 2000/01 to determine the feed consumption, body weight, weight gain, feed efficiency, protein efficiency, and economy of broiler chicken; and growth response, livability and mortality of quail on locally available diets supplemented with critical amino acids (Methionine and lysine). The locally available feed ingredients, such as yellow maize, rice polish, soybean meal, mustard cake, sunflower cake, fishmeal, bone meal and limestone were used along with salt, minerals and vitamins mixture. Soybean oil was added to fulfill the energy requirements, while synthetic methionine and lysine was used for supplementation of deficient amino acids. In the first experiment, 200 day-old 'Vencobb' broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 5 dietary treatments: 23 percent CP without methionine and lysine supplementation; and 21, 19, 17 and 15 percent CP, each supplemented with methionine and lysine. They were organized in a Completely Randomized Design with 10 chicks in a treatment. Each treatment was replicated four times. Second experiment was conducted with the same chicks used in first experiment (3 week old) using 5 dietary teatments. They were organized in a Completely Randomized Design with 4 replicates. In the case of third experiment, quail were adlibitum fed layer starter ration with, or without additional 5 percent fish meal 125g methionine and 250 g lysine per 100 kg of feed was supplied during 0-4 weeks of growing period. There was no significant differences among the treatments (23% CP+no methionine and lysine; and 21, 19 and 17% CP with the addition of methionine and lysine each) with respect to feed intake; final body weight, and weight gain during starter period (0-3 weeks). Similar result was obtained during finisher period (3-6 weeks). Chicks fed with 15 percent CP in starter and 12 percent CP in finisher with supplemental methionine and lysine showed significantly (P<0.05) lower feed intake, final live weight, and weight gain. Similarly chicks fed with 23% CP +no methionine and lysine and 21, 19 and 17 percent CP with addition of methionine and lysine, each in starter and 20% CP +no methionine and lysine and 18, 16 and 14 percent CP with addition of methionine and lysine each in finisher period had similar feed efficiency and income over feed and chick cost (IOFCC), but chicks fed diets with 15 percent CP in starter and 12 percent CP in finisher with supplemental methionine and lysine showed significantly (P<0.05) inferior feed efficiency and the lowest IOFCC. Protein was efficiently (P<0.05) utilized by chicks fed diets with 19, 17 and 15% CP in starter and 16, 14 and 12% CP in finisher with addition of methionine and lysine each. But chicks fed diets with 23% CP +no methionine and lysine and 21 percent CP with addition of methionine and lysine in starter and 20% CP +no methiononine and lysine and 18% CP with addition of methionine and lysine in finisher did not utilize (P<0.05) protein efficiently for their growth and development. Positive growth response and better health status of chicks was also observed from quail fed layer starter mash with additional 5 percent fish meal. It is concluded that with supplemental methionine and lysine the CP levels of broiler chicks could be reduced up to 19 percent for starter (0-3 weeks) and 16 percent for finisher (3-6 weeks) without compromising feed intake, provided that feed ingredients are locally based. There is a need of similar experiment, however, on quail and turkey to determine possible reduction in CP level for optimum production. Information on protein utilization also revealed that further studies should be done with respect to CP levels and use of other indispensable amino acids in  broiler chicks diets for better utilization of nitrogen content in the ration.

 
 
 
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